ING International Trade Study now available

ING International Trade Study now available

On 8 November 2012, ING presented the International Trade Study by the ING Economics Department. This study provides valuable insights on the current and future economic trends and international trade developments worldwide. It may help you to learn more about doing business across borders and to identify new market opportunities, as it provides you with detailed knowledge on the markets and products of their interest.

“International trade makes the world go round,” says Fabienne Fortanier, senior economist at ING and author of this Trade Study. “World trade has historically grown much faster than output and we expect that to continue.”

Forecasts 2012-2017

The summary of the report International Trade Study – Developments in global trade 1997-2017 documents the trade developments over the past years and the ING forecasts (2012-2017) for future international trade patterns and business opportunities. It may help you to learn more about doing business across borders and to identify new market opportunities. In the PDF report you can find over 70 different country and product reports that provide details on the growth markets in each country and product.

Shift towards Asia

The report documents how the centre of gravity of international trade is shifting towards Asia. But on average, countries still trade most with their closest neighbours, as geographical distance may also mean larger costs. This meaning that your next export market may also be just around the corner!

Watch video below with Mark Cliffe, the Group’s chief economist, on this topic, with a short introduction by Fabienne Fortanier.

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International Trade Study – Developments in global trade 1997-2017 (PDF, summary)

www.ing.nl/tradestudy for more information + full report (English)

Last modified: 13 November 2012

Last modified: 13 November 2012

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