ING Collection celebrates anniversary with masterpieces at the Cobra Museum

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The coming months, the Cobra Museum is proud to present The Hidden Picture, an exhibition with masterpieces from the ING Collection. Sanne ten Brink has been closely involved as head curator of the ING Collection.

Jan Worst (1953)  Die Abenteuerin (The Adventuress), 1993, <br>oil on canvas (100 x 200 cm).

Jan Worst (1953) Die Abenteuerin (The Adventuress), 1993,
oil on canvas (100 x 200 cm).

This exhibition is being held on the occasion of the ING Collection's 40th anniversary. The original reason for actively collecting art was to create a positive and inspiring work environment. Today, art and ING are inextricably connected.

"Art inspires", says Sanne ten Brink, "divides and binds, takes people out of their comfort zone and sparks both critical thought and dialogue. Such as between customers and staff.” Hence the central importance given to art at ING – a tradition which is still going strong after forty years. “We have never collected for the money”, says Ten Brink, “but rather always for love and admiration of the artwork and the artist.”

Besides collecting, ING also supports young talent. For this exhibition, for instance, ING has invited three artists from art institute De Ateliers to produce new work. ING has been involved in this institute for more than ten years.

“Collecting for love and admiration of the work, not for the money”

Sanne ten Brink, head curator of the ING Collection

Contemporary art

In the 1970s, ING (NMB back then) was one of the first companies in the Netherlands to start collecting art. The emphasis at that time was on figurative art, but thanks to various acquisitions in Belgium, Poland and the United Kingdom the collection has grown to 15,000 works of art representing a variety of movements and styles with the focus on contemporary art.

The Hidden Picture presents 70 works of art from the international collection together for the very first time – from paintings, drawings and sculpture to photography and videos including masterpieces by artists the likes of Michelangelo Pistoletto, Carel Willink, Jaap Hillenius, Michael Raedecker and Christian Boltanski.

Exhibition

The Hidden Picture opens on 13 September 2014 at the Cobra Museum of Modern Art in Amstelveen. The exhibition runs until 4 January 2015. Further information can be found on the Cobra Museum's website. ING card holders receive a second ticket free when purchasing a ticket to The Hidden Picture at the Cobra Museum. This promotion is not valid in conjunction with other special offers or the annual museum pass. Click here for details about the ING Collection.

Roni Horn (1955)  Some Thames, 2000, colour photograph with UV varnish  <br>(71 x 103 cm, each of the 80 sections).

Roni Horn (1955) Some Thames, 2000, colour photograph with UV varnish
(71 x 103 cm, each of the 80 sections).

Own signature

So how do you go about a new acquisition? Ten Brink: “The premise of ING's acquisition policy is to purchase new works that fit in with the existing collection, are of a high quality and have what we call their 'own signature' style. In recent years, however, ING has been extremely reserved with new acquisitions.

In the meantime, ING tries to enable as many people as possible to enjoy the existing collection. Ten Brink: “The works of art normally hang at ING's office locations worldwide. We regularly lend out works or organise exhibitions, such as now in collaboration with the Cobra Museum. I hope that the public at large will enjoy The Hidden Picture.”

Elżbieta Jabłońska (1970)  Gry domowe / Household Games, 2003, colour photograph <br>(150 x 274 cm).

Elżbieta Jabłońska (1970) Gry domowe / Household Games, 2003, colour photograph
(150 x 274 cm).

Sanne ten Brink on the works of art

“The works of art depicted in this article form a nice selection from the international ING Collection. The oldest work in the exhibition was painted in 1910 by British artist Henry Lamb, a modern painter who excelled in his unique and innovative portraiture.

This spirit of innovation can also be seen in the work of Michael Raedecker, whose style is characterised by the use of textile in his paintings — not surprising for an artist who graduated from fashion school.

American artist Jonathan Lasker had his own style as well. Lasker developed his own abstract style at the time that video art, photography and minimal art set the scene.

In brief, we can say that all these works of art are very typical of the artists themselves. The artist's own signature style is clearly visible, and that is a chief criterion for ING.

These artworks fit in well with the collection because they all have their own character; they therefore add to the collection. ING's intention has always been for the collection to provide a representative survey of contemporary art, with the focus on the figurative tradition."

Jessica Diamond (1957)  “You” from the Eros (Rain) series, 1998, mural in acrylic paint.

Jessica Diamond (1957) “You” from the Eros (Rain) series, 1998, mural in acrylic paint.

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