ING Collection

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ING has been engaged in the world of art for more than 43 years now. We actively collect art for the ING Collection and hold exhibitions in the Netherlands and abroad as well as in our own exhibition space in Brussels. We also sponsor museums, such as the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, and encourage young and creative talent via a variety of initiatives.

Installation view with Richard Deacon (1949), Stefan Kroner (1973), Roni Horn (1955) and Tjebbe Beekman (1972) in Cobra Museum for Modern Art

Installation view with Richard Deacon (1949), Stefan Kroner (1973), Roni Horn (1955) and Tjebbe Beekman (1972) in Cobra Museum for Modern Art

Why does ING have an art collection?

ING started to collect art in 1974 and has continued to do so because art is often a source of inspiration, one that encourages innovation and contributes to a pleasant office environment.

Aim of the ING Collection

The collection aims to contribute to a culture of innovation and change within ING and beyond. This is done in several ways.

We encourage new, young and rising talent via various partnerships, such as the ING Unseen Talent Award for photography talent and CREATIS, which backs creative entrepreneurs in Belgium.

Art is part of the office environment where we work and see our customers. Works from the collection are displayed at 500 ING locations worldwide.

Works from the collection are shown worldwide at our own exhibitions and are regularly on loan to leading museums such as the Pushkin Museum in Moscow, the Cobra Museum in Amstelveen and MoA in Seoul.

We purchase works to keep the collection innovative and up to date, now and in the future. All works are also in keeping with the art policy launched by us in 2013 (read more about this in History).

<center>Matthew Day Jackson, (1974) <br><em>Lumpenproletariat (Alive)</em>, 2010 <br>Wood and plastic</center>

Matthew Day Jackson, (1974)
Lumpenproletariat (Alive), 2010
Wood and plastic

Encouraging young talent

ING has a variety of partnerships in the arts where young, rising and creative talent is encouraged.

ING Unseen Talent Award

Together with the Unseen Photo Fair and Festival, the ING Unseen Talent Award for new photography talent has been organised since 2013. Along with Unseen, the aim of this award is to kick-start the careers of talented photographers by offering them a talent programme with different workshops, via work commissioned by ING and by giving them an international platform where they can show their work.

Incubator for businesses in the cultural and creative sector

In December 2016, ING in Belgium joined hands with CREATIS, the breeding ground for cultural entrepreneurs, and crowdfunding platform KissKissBankBank to launch the first incubator for Belgian businesses in the cultural and creative sector. Our aim with this incubator is to guide and accelerate the development of these businesses by providing tailored expertise.

ING lounge during Photo Fair and Festival Unseen Amsterdam. The lounge shows work from ING Unseen Talent Award finalists (Photo by: Rebecca Metzger)

ING lounge during Photo Fair and Festival Unseen Amsterdam. The lounge shows work from ING Unseen Talent Award finalists (Photo by: Rebecca Metzger)

Where can you see the ING Collection?

Besides the collection's function of contributing to a culture of innovation and change, its public function is also important to ING. Our aim is therefore to make the works as accessible as possible to a wide audience.

Besides the art that is displayed at our own office locations – 500 worldwide – and in leading museums, selected artworks can be viewed online. Throughout the years, ING has also published a variety of art catalogues, either in connection with an exhibition or to provide a nice survey of the collection. This takes the ING Collection from the walls into people’s homes.

History

The ING Collection has its origins in the former NMB collections.

The history of the ING Collection dates back to 1974 with the opening of a new head office for NMB (the Dutch bank for SMEs) in Amsterdam. In the course of time, collections were added to NMB's through various mergers and acquisitions.

In 1991, ING was born out of a merger between NMB Postbank Group and Nationale-Nederlanden. This gave way to the ING Collection in the Netherlands.

The company was also in motion worldwide. In 1998, ING merged with Bank Brussel Lambert (BBL), in 1995 there was the acquisition of Barings Bank and in 2001 ING acquired a majority stake in ING Bank Slaski. The internationally important art collections of these banks were added to the ING Collection.

Announced in October 2009, the separation of the Group's banking and insurance business sparked ING Art Management to revise the collection. ING Art Management divided the collection then into an ING Bank Collection and an Insurance Collection.

In 2013, a new policy was announced for the ING Collection. The focus shifted more towards international art by artists who push the boundaries of the figurative tradition and are not averse to experimentation. We reduced the collection at that time from 25,000 works to 10,000. This policy and the 10,000 selected works define the contours of the current ING Collection.

<center>Markus Selg (1974) <br><em>Refuge (Ganvie)</em>, 2014 <br>filmframe, 3 screens / sublimation print on fabric, 4 parts<center>

Markus Selg (1974)
Refuge (Ganvie), 2014
filmframe, 3 screens / sublimation print on fabric, 4 parts

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